Conversational AI – Research Papers

By | February 20, 2020

I hope to keep this page up to date with the latest published papers that I found interesting on the topic of conversational AI.

Feb 2020

Improving Multi-Turn Response Selection Models with Complementary Last-Utterance Selection by Instance Weighting

Open-domain retrieval-based dialogue systems require a considerable amount of training data to learn their parameters. However, in practice, the negative samples of training data are usually selected from an unannotated conversation data set at random. The generated training data is likely to contain noise and affect the performance of the response selection models. To address this difficulty, we consider utilizing the underlying correlation in the data resource itself to derive different kinds of supervision signals and reduce the influence of noisy data. More specially, we consider a main-complementary task pair. The main task (\ie our focus) selects the correct response given the last utterance and context, and the complementary task selects the last utterance given the response and context. The key point is that the output of the complementary task is used to set instance weights for the main task. We conduct extensive experiments in two public datasets and obtain significant improvement in both datasets. We also investigate the variant of our approach in multiple aspects, and the results have verified the effectiveness of our approach.

Sequential Latent Knowledge Selection for Knowledge-Grounded Dialogue

Knowledge-grounded dialogue is a task of generating an informative response based on both discourse context and external knowledge. As we focus on better modeling the knowledge selection in the multi-turn knowledge-grounded dialogue, we propose a sequential latent variable model as the first approach to this matter. The model named sequential knowledge transformer (SKT) can keep track of the prior and posterior distribution over knowledge; as a result, it can not only reduce the ambiguity caused from the diversity in knowledge selection of conversation but also better leverage the response information for proper choice of knowledge. Our experimental results show that the proposed model improves the knowledge selection accuracy and subsequently the performance of utterance generation. We achieve the new state-of-the-art performance on Wizard of Wikipedia (Dinan et al., 2019) as one of the most large-scale and challenging benchmarks. We further validate the effectiveness of our model over existing conversation methods in another knowledge-based dialogue Holl-E dataset (Moghe et al., 2018).

ConvLab-2: An Open-Source Toolkit for Building, Evaluating, and Diagnosing Dialogue Systems

We present ConvLab-2, an open-source toolkit that enables researchers to build task-oriented dialogue systems with state-of-the-art models, perform an end-to-end evaluation, and diagnose the weakness of systems. As the successor of ConvLab (Lee et al., 2019b), ConvLab-2 inherits ConvLab’s framework but integrates more powerful dialogue models and supports more datasets. Besides, we have developed an analysis tool and an interactive tool to assist researchers in diagnosing dialogue systems. The analysis tool presents rich statistics and summarizes common mistakes from simulated dialogues, which facilitates error analysis and system improvement. The interactive tool provides a user interface that allows developers to diagnose an assembled dialogue system by interacting with the system and modifying the output of each system component. Code.

Dec 2019

Neural Module Networks for Reasoning over Text

Answering compositional questions that require multiple steps of reasoning against text is challenging, especially when they involve discrete, symbolic operations. Neural module networks (NMNs) learn to parse such questions as executable programs composed of learnable modules, performing well on synthetic visual QA domains. However, we find that it is challenging to learn these models for non-synthetic questions on open-domain text, where a model needs to deal with the diversity of natural language and perform a broader range of reasoning. We extend NMNs by: (a) introducing modules that reason over a paragraph of text, performing symbolic reasoning (such as arithmetic, sorting, counting) over numbers and dates in a probabilistic and differentiable manner; and (b) proposing an unsupervised auxiliary loss to help extract arguments associated with the events in text. Additionally, we show that a limited amount of heuristically-obtained question program and intermediate module output supervision provides sufficient inductive bias for accurate learning. Our proposed model significantly outperforms state-of-the-art models on a subset of the DROP dataset that poses a variety of reasoning challenges that are covered by our modules.

Benchmarking Zero-shot Text Classification: Datasets, Evaluation and Entailment Approach

Zero-shot text classification (0Shot-TC) is a challenging NLU problem to which little attention has been paid by the research community. 0Shot-TC aims to associate an appropriate label with a piece of text, irrespective of the text domain and the aspect (e.g., topic, emotion, event, etc.) described by the label. And there are only a few articles studying 0Shot-TC, all focusing only on topical categorization which, we argue, is just the tip of the iceberg in 0Shot-TC. In addition, the chaotic experiments in literature make no uniform comparison, which blurs the progress.

Cross-Lingual Ability of Multilingual BERT: An Empirical Study

Recent work has exhibited the surprising cross-lingual abilities of multilingual BERT (M-BERT) — surprising since it is trained without any cross-lingual objective and with no aligned data. In this work, we provide a comprehensive study of the contribution of different components in M-BERT to its cross-lingual ability. We study the impact of linguistic properties of the languages, the architecture of the model, and the learning objectives. The experimental study is done in the context of three typologically different languages — Spanish, Hindi, and Russian — and using two conceptually different NLP tasks, textual entailment and named entity recognition. Among our key conclusions is the fact that the lexical overlap between languages plays a negligible role in the cross-lingual success, while the depth of the network is an integral part of it.

Libri-Light: A Benchmark for ASR with Limited or No Supervision

We introduce a new collection of spoken English audio suitable for training speech recognition systems under limited or no supervision. It is derived from open-source audio books from the LibriVox project. It contains over 60K hours of audio, which is, to our knowledge, the largest freely-available corpus of speech. The audio has been segmented using voice activity detection and is tagged with SNR, speaker ID and genre descriptions. Additionally, we provide baseline systems and evaluation metrics working under three settings: (1) the zero resource/unsupervised setting (ABX), (2) the semi-supervised setting (PER, CER) and (3) the distant supervision setting (WER). Settings (2) and (3) use limited textual resources (10 minutes to 10 hours) aligned with the speech. Setting (3) uses large amounts of unaligned text. They are evaluated on the standard LibriSpeech dev and test sets for comparison with the supervised state-of-the-art.

Extending Machine Language Models toward Human-Level Language Understanding

Language is central to human intelligence. We review recent breakthroughs in machine language processing and consider what remains to be achieved. Recent approaches rely on domain general principles of learning and representation captured in artificial neural networks. Most current models, however, focus too closely on language itself. In humans, language is part of a larger system for acquiring, representing, and communicating about objects and situations in the physical and social world, and future machine language models should emulate such a system. We describe existing machine models linking language to concrete situations, and point toward extensions to address more abstract cases. Human language processing exploits complementary learning systems, including a deep neural network-like learning system that learns gradually as machine systems do, as well as a fast-learning system that supports learning new information quickly. Adding such a system to machine language models will be an important further step toward truly human-like language understanding.

How to Evaluate the Next System: Automatic Dialogue Evaluation from
the Perspective of Continual Learning

Automatic dialogue evaluation plays a crucial role in open-domain dialogue research. Previous works train neural networks with limited annotation for conducting automatic dialogue evaluation, which would naturally affect the evaluation fairness as dialogue systems close to the scope of training corpus would have more preference than the other ones. In this paper, we study alleviating this problem from the perspective of continual learning: given an existing neural dialogue evaluator and the next system to be evaluated, we fine-tune the learned neural evaluator by selectively forgetting/updating its parameters, to jointly fit dialogue systems have been and will be evaluated. Our motivation is to seek for a lifelong and low-cost automatic evaluation for dialogue systems, rather than to reconstruct the evaluator over and over again. Experimental results show that our continual evaluator achieves comparable performance with reconstructing new evaluators, while requires significantly lower resources.

Nov 2019

Learning to Retrieve Reasoning Paths over Wikipedia Graph for Question Answering

Answering questions that require multi-hop reasoning at web-scale necessitates retrieving multiple evidence documents, one of which often has little lexical or semantic relationship to the question. This paper introduces a new graph-based recurrent retrieval approach that learns to retrieve reasoning paths over the Wikipedia graph to answer multi-hop open-domain questions. Our retriever model trains a recurrent neural network that learns to sequentially retrieve evidence paragraphs in the reasoning path by conditioning on the previously retrieved documents. Our reader model ranks the reasoning paths and extracts the answer span included in the best reasoning path. Experimental results show state-of-the-art results in three open-domain QA datasets, showcasing the effectiveness and robustness of our method. Notably, our method achieves significant improvement in HotpotQA, outperforming the previous best model by more than 14 points.

Sept 2019

End-to-end Named Entity Recognition and Relation Extraction using Pre-trained Language Models

Named entity recognition (NER) and relation extraction (RE) are two important tasks in information extraction and retrieval (IE \& IR). Recent work has demonstrated that it is beneficial to learn these tasks jointly, which avoids the propagation of error inherent in pipeline-based systems and improves performance. However, state-of-the-art joint models typically rely on external natural language processing (NLP) tools, such as dependency parsers, limiting their usefulness to domains (e.g. news) where those tools perform well. The few neural, end-to-end models that have been proposed are trained almost completely from scratch. In this paper, we propose a neural, end-to-end model for jointly extracting entities and their relations which does not rely on external NLP tools and which integrates a large, pre-trained language model. Because the bulk of our model’s parameters are pre-trained and we eschew recurrence for self-attention, our model is fast to train. On 5 datasets across 3 domains, our model matches or exceeds state-of-the-art performance, sometimes by a large margin.

July 2019

Towards Universal Dialogue Act Tagging for Task-Oriented Dialogues

Machine learning approaches for building task-oriented dialogue systems require large conversational datasets with labels to train on. We are interested in building task-oriented dialogue systems from human-human conversations, which may be available in ample amounts in existing customer care center logs or can be collected from crowd workers. Annotating these datasets can be prohibitively expensive. Recently multiple annotated task-oriented human-machine dialogue datasets have been released, however their annotation schema varies across different collections, even for well-defined categories such as dialogue acts (DAs). We propose a Universal DA schema for task-oriented dialogues and align existing annotated datasets with our schema. Our aim is to train a Universal DA tagger (U-DAT) for task-oriented dialogues and use it for tagging human-human conversations. We investigate multiple datasets, propose manual and automated approaches for aligning the different schema, and present results on a target corpus of human-human dialogues. In unsupervised learning experiments we achieve an F1 score of 54.1% on system turns in human-human dialogues. In a semi-supervised setup, the F1 score increases to 57.7% which would otherwise require at least 1.7K manually annotated turns. For new domains, we show further improvements when unlabeled or labeled target domain data is available. 

May 2019

Transferable Multi-Domain State Generator for Task-Oriented Dialogue Systems

Over-dependence on domain ontology and lack of knowledge sharing across domains are two practical and yet less studied problems of dialogue state tracking. Existing approaches generally fall short in tracking unknown slot values during inference and often have difficulties in adapting to new domains. In this paper, we propose a Transferable Dialogue State Generator (TRADE) that generates dialogue states from utterances using a copy mechanism, facilitating knowledge transfer when predicting (domain, slot, value) triplets not encountered during training. Our model is composed of an utterance encoder, a slot gate, and a state generator, which are shared across domains. Empirical results demonstrate that TRADE achieves state-of-the-art joint goal accuracy of 48.62% for the five domains of MultiWOZ, a human-human dialogue dataset. In addition, we show its transferring ability by simulating zero-shot and few-shot dialogue state tracking for unseen domains. TRADE achieves 60.58% joint goal accuracy in one of the zero-shot domains, and is able to adapt to few-shot cases without forgetting already trained domains. Code.

April 2019

Better Automatic Evaluation of Open-Domain Dialogue Systems with Contextualized Embeddings

Despite advances in open-domain dialogue systems, automatic evaluation of such systems is still a challenging problem. Traditional reference-based metrics such as BLEU are ineffective because there could be many valid responses for a given context that share no common words with reference responses. A recent work proposed Referenced metric and Unreferenced metric Blended Evaluation Routine (RUBER) to combine a learning-based metric, which predicts relatedness between a generated response and a given query, with reference-based metric; it showed high correlation with human judgments. In this paper, we explore using contextualized word embeddings to compute more accurate relatedness scores, thus better evaluation metrics. Experiments show that our evaluation metrics outperform RUBER, which is trained on static embeddings.

March 2019

Privacy-preserving Active Learning on Sensitive Data for User Intent Classification

Active learning holds promise of significantly reducing data annotation costs while maintaining reasonable model performance. However, it requires sending data to annotators for labeling. This presents a possible privacy leak when the training set includes sensitive user data. In this paper, we describe an approach for carrying out privacy preserving active learning with quantifiable guarantees. We evaluate our approach by showing the tradeoff between privacy, utility and annotation budget on a binary classification task in a active learning setting.

Earlier research papers

RUBER: An Unsupervised Method for Automatic Evaluation of Open-Domain Dialog Systems

Open-domain human-computer conversation has been attracting increasing attention over the past few years. However, there does not exist a standard automatic evaluation metric for open-domain dialog systems; researchers usually resort to human annotation for model evaluation, which is time- and labor-intensive. In this paper, we propose RUBER, a Referenced metric and Unreferenced metric Blended Evaluation Routine, which evaluates a reply by taking into consideration both a groundtruth reply and a query (previous user-issued utterance). Our metric is learnable, but its training does not require labels of human satisfaction. Hence, RUBER is flexible and extensible to different datasets and languages. Experiments on both retrieval and generative dialog systems show that RUBER has a high correlation with human annotation.

 
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